Porta del Popolo, Rome

Porta del Popolo, Rome

JAN ASSELIJN (c.1616-c.1652

Porta del Popolo, Rome
indistinctly dated lower left
pen, pink and brown wash
11 x 17 in. (28 x 43 cm.)

Jan Asselijn (1610-1652) came originally from a Huguenot family in Dieppe and moved to Amsterdam to receive training in the studio of Esaias van der Velde (1587-1630) and his nephew and pupil, Jan Maertzen de Jonge , famous not only for animal designs and landscapes but also for pictures of cavalry skirmishes . Asselijn left such scenes behind him when, in 1635, he made his way to Rome and, like many Northerners before him, became a convert to the Italianate style of landscape, of which his countryman, Claude Lorrain, had been the precursor. He settled into the Dutch colony there and bore the nickname 'Crabbetje'. He stayed in Rome for at least a decade and was to be found once again in Amsterdam in 1647, having first found a French wife. A number of his Italian vedute, particularly of Roman ruins, were engraved subsequently by Gabriel Perelle. Asselijn remains best known, however, for his Threatened Swan in the Rijksmuseum, interpreted as an allegory of Dutch resistance to foreign tyranny.

Netherlands